Comic-Con International > CCI General Discussion

Writers Strike is On

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sessionka:
Movie and tv content are really not my focus when I go to SDCC, but if it lasts until the Con, it may affect Panels and Offsites. 

Thoughts... :smilie_confused_dontknow:


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perc2100:
You are not allowed to view links. Register or LoginMovie and tv content are really not my focus when I go to SDCC, but if it lasts until the Con, it may affect Panels and Offsites. 

Thoughts... :smilie_confused_dontknow:


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--- End quote ---
First, I'm a union person: I'm an education union negotiator and will 100% _always_ support workers over management.
Second, I do have several friends in the WGA, so I'm a bit familiar with the 'inside baseball' stuff involved with these negotiations, and I support what the WGA is trying to get for their members, and sincerely hope the Hollywood studios can accomodate.

That all being said, it'll be interesting to see how any of this impacts SDCC.  The last WGA strike, IIRC, was late 07-early 08 so this round of negotiation/strikes is a bit of 'new territory' as far as how it could impact SDCC.  First and foremost, if this strike DOES last through SDCC, I wouldn't expect any writers (and likely most Showrunners) to attend SDCC for panels.  SDCC for them are essentially looked at as marketing presentations, and writers almost certainly wouldn't attend an event to market product that enriches the studios they're fighting against.

IF the strike ends in similar time as the last, the WGA will almost certainly still be on strike through SDCC (the last strike lasted 100+ days IIRC).  Not only will it impact panelists, but it could impact what footage is available for studios to present.  Productions will shutdown, as writers are often integral on-set, for post-production (reshoots, ADR stuff, etc), etc.  Some productions WON'T shutdown, though showrunners and writers won't be on set to tweak story/character arcs or dialogue (for example, "The Shield" was filming their final few eps of the series during the WGA strike, the showrunner was literally picketing when the last scene of the series was shot, and he has publicly said he would've made sure the scene was shot differently had he been around - not that he was complaining).  I recall in the past movies rush into production w/out a finish script and leave it up to the director/actors/producers to throw stuff together to string scenes along to formulate a movie (LETHAL WEAPON 4 is a notorious one; so is IRON MAN 2, though I don't recall if either of those were due to strikes).  Some studios could be behind on production and 1) not have footage to show at SDCC so they either limit what they bring OR bail altogether and/or 2) can't afford to have directors/actors/whomever leaving production to attend a marketing convention.  While there have been cases of talent leaving set, flying directly to SDCC for a panel, then immediately flying back to set, that's more rare than common.

Long story short, it's hard to speculate, but I think it's prudent for us to 'brace ourselves,' so to speak, and not be shocked if a studio who usually attends SDCC doesn't this year

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semigeekgirl:
I 100% support the WGA.

That being said, most productions won't shut down right away. Late night talk/variety shows (including SNL) will go dark pretty much immediately, as those can't be written ahead of time.

For other productions, though, the studios will try to continue production (mostly) for as long as they can until they run out of scripts. Writers USED to be integral on-set for productions (and they still are on many of the best shows), but studios have been moving more and more away from that model - it's one of the main points of contention in the strike. Studios (especially the streamers like Netflix) have been trying to force writers to write the scripts completely ahead of time, often alone instead of in writers' rooms  - this is the 'miniroom' trend the WGA is objecting to, and trying to fix by forcing the studios to guarantee staffed writing rooms for the duration of a production. Minirooms allow studios to pay writers much, much less, because they're employed for only a few weeks rather than throughout a season.

So: most film and tv productions will continue shooting for a few weeks or months. For now SAG-AFTRA (actors) and DGA (directors) have told their members they may continue working even if their location is being picketed. That may change as their contracts get closer to expiring. Also some things are already in post-production, so those will continue.

If the strike continues into July, You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login is right - most writers and showrunners will not attend. Neil Gaiman already mentioned on Twitter that he's already handed in his scripts for Good Omens 2, but that he will probably not be able to promote it.

chocolateshake:
You are not allowed to view links. Register or LoginMovie and tv content are really not my focus when I go to SDCC, but if it lasts until the Con, it may affect Panels and Offsites. 

Thoughts... :smilie_confused_dontknow:


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--- End quote ---

Looking at the rules, You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login, I don't see any specific rule against attending SDCC or any other convention.  I don't see a provision against helping to promote delivered work.  Although I guess attending could be interpreted as seeking future work which is prohibited.  As I see it, the big thing will be if there's a union presence at SDCC.  If there's anything like a picket line, I don't see people working in the industry crossing it.  Even those in other unions.

IMO, the big hangup with the WGA demands is the AI prohibition.  Basically, they want to ban AI.  I don't see that happening.  I even see going on strike as helping to accelerate it's adoption.  Since I can easily see the studios seeing how well AI's can write scripts if the writers don't want to.  Ashton Kutcher was on CNBC today talking about how an author friend of his trained an AI on his previous books and had it write another book for him.  That is exactly what the WGA wants to ban.  Ashton Kutcher believes in it so much that he's putting 240 million dollars into AI development.  Trying to take a stand against AI is like trying to stop the future from happening.  That's not going to happen.

FlamedLiquid:
Hoping this is resolved quick.

I'd assume this effects television more then film.

Will be interesting to see how this develops.

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