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All Other Conventions (aka Friendly Neighborhood) => Other Comic Cons and Conventions => Topic started by: alyssa on January 23, 2015, 05:54:43 AM

Title: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on January 23, 2015, 05:54:43 AM
I ran across an interesting article which surveyed more then a 100 vendors/talent at conventions.  The article went into the amt of money made at each con.
http://comicsbeat.com/the-devastatorbeat-convention-exhibitor-survey-is-out-which-cons-are-loved-which-are-hated/?utm_content=buffere4ab3&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer


(https://www.friendsofcc.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fcomicsbeat.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2015%2F01%2Fconvention-survey-zine-2014-2.png&hash=25c093d3b84af21f6983ef87a0b81d2fc73afc4e)
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: tehlilone on January 23, 2015, 07:36:46 AM
That's interesting to see. I skimmed the report. I might've missed it but I'm assuming the numbers are based on profits and not flat sales amounts? I'd like to see booth/table costs compared also.

I also don't think it said if they averaged the amount of days each show was. For instance, SDCC is a 4-5 day event when other shows are only 1-2 days.

It's teh lil one! Sent while on the move!!

Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Transmute Jun on January 23, 2015, 07:51:00 AM
I was reading that article a couple of days ago, and one thing that struck me was how little these small artists make. Even at the top cons, it was something like $1,000 to $2,000 per show, and that's before all of their costs. It's really not very much, and it brought home to me how much they appreciate any business they can get.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: vegasndn on January 23, 2015, 08:35:28 AM

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I was reading that article a couple of days ago, and one thing that struck me was how little these small artists make. Even at the top cons, it was something like $1,000 to $2,000 per show, and that's before all of their costs. It's really not very much, and it brought home to me how much they appreciate any business they can get.
I'm surprise by how much they make. At SDCC I walk around in artist alley while people are fighting over free swag. I wonder around and  just talk to the vendors. Some will be sitting there looking bored, I'll ask them questions about their booth and boy do they light up and go on about their books, art and clothing. Just to listen to them and their passion it's pretty darn cool.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Chris on January 23, 2015, 08:39:17 AM
Am I missing it or did the article mention how much the vendors have to pay for their booths at the various shows?

At smaller shows for example when they vendors only have to pay $100 for their booth, they bring lower cost stuff because they are less concerned about recouping their costs.

The profit they make per booth after costs would be interesting to have.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Trev on January 23, 2015, 09:15:37 AM
I think it is gross and not net. labor and materials costs are not taken into account if I'm reading it correctly.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Chris on January 23, 2015, 09:21:19 AM
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I think it is gross and not net. labor and materials costs are not taken into account if I'm reading it correctly.

Net would be interesting to see as well.  I THINK (not 100% on this) that the smallest not-corner booth at SDCC is $2,000.  At mini cons, tables can be $100.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Trev on January 23, 2015, 09:43:31 AM
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Net would be interesting to see as well.  I THINK (not 100% on this) that the smallest not-corner booth at SDCC is $2,000.  At mini cons, tables can be $100.

AA is free at SDCC and Small Press is like $500 or $800, I think. The red area is where it starts to get a bit pricier for small vendors.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Chris on January 23, 2015, 09:45:19 AM
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AA is free at SDCC and Small Press is like $500 or $800, I think. The red area is where it starts to get a bit pricier for small vendors.

Yeah, sorry.  My $ figure was for booth vendors like comic back issue sales, not artist's alley, small press, etc.  Good point.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Mel on January 23, 2015, 09:45:37 AM
I wonder why they didn't post profit graphs and only sales? They know the profts because under "Super Rating" it says they got the super rating by taking average profits (sales minus booth cost) x rating.

Seems to me that sales v. profit is a big distinction. My friend is an exhibitor and told me she usually always makes more at smaller shows because of lower booth cost plus higher visibility when there aren't a million vendors to compete with.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Chris on January 23, 2015, 09:48:20 AM
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I wonder why they didn't post profit graphs and only sales? They know the profts because under "Super Rating" it says they got the super rating by taking average profits (sales minus booth cost) x rating.

Seems to me that sales v. profit is a big distinction. My friend is an exhibitor and told me she usually always makes more at smaller shows because of lower booth cost plus higher visibility when there aren't a million vendors to compete with.

Agreed.  As I talk to back issue vendors, the thing they are always talking about is their break even point.  Usually I have heard them talk about the break even for their booth costs and then their break even for the show (hotel, travel costs, etc).

I have seen a lot of stressed out vendors until they hit the 2nd mark.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Mel on January 23, 2015, 09:55:01 AM
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Agreed.  As I talk to back issue vendors, the thing they are always talking about is their break even point.  Usually I have heard them talk about the break even for their booth costs and then their break even for the show (hotel, travel costs, etc).

I have seen a lot of stressed out vendors until they hit the 2nd mark.
Yep. I wonder how any of the smaller vendors make money at SDCC, it's easy to get lost in the mix with all the huge exhibitors. And add the travel and hotel and shipping your product. My friend told me she tries to take into account the exposure at SDCC, but she's an artist with a web comic specializing in merch based on her characters. I don't think exposure would matter as much to comic book dealers. People are just going to those booths looking for the best deal that day. Not a character or item to fall in love with and seek out from them in the future.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Chris on January 23, 2015, 10:00:49 AM
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Yep. I wonder how any of the smaller vendors make money at SDCC, it's easy to get lost in the mix with all the huge exhibitors. And add the travel and hotel and shipping your product. My friend told me she tries to take into account the exposure at SDCC, but she's an artist with a web comic specializing in merch based on her characters. I don't think exposure would matter as much to comic book dealers. People are just going to those booths looking for the best deal that day. Not a character or item to fall in love with and seek out from them in the future.

That is why a lot of comic vendors that I have spoken to have left--they don't make enough money.  The primary reasons for this that they have told me are:  rising booth prices and other costs and the change in the attendee base.

My opinion only:   This is why the silver age pavilion is most of what has survived.  Those books are higher price/margin so they can recuperate their costs more easily.

Does anyone know how some of the big booths like Fox work?  Are they trying to make money or is it straight up advertising budget?
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Mel on January 23, 2015, 10:05:59 AM
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That is why a lot of comic vendors that I have spoken to have left--they don't make enough money.  The primary reasons for this that they have told me are:  rising booth prices and other costs and the change in the attendee base.

My opinion only:   This is why the silver age pavilion is most of what has survived.  Those books are higher price/margin so they can recuperate their costs more easily.

Does anyone know how some of the big booths like Fox work?  Are they trying to make money or is it straight up advertising budget?
Fox is the weird one out of the big corporate film/tv booths because they sell a little merchandise. WB, AMC, Starz ect just give away freebies and do autographs so I bet they are total marketing budget. Fox does bring in a little money.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: karl clement on January 23, 2015, 03:50:19 PM
my experience has been that if they don't have what  you want they don't get your $$$$, that's the problem, if the vendor guesses wrong and forgets to bring stuff he will make less then the dealer who brings other stuff, its also price based as well, also its how its displayed, some venders poorly display there stock, there booth is poorly set up, hard to move around in, for myself if its hard to move around in  I stay away, no matter how good the product,
Title: Even business people want to talk about Comic Con
Post by: Transmute Jun on July 17, 2015, 06:30:11 AM
Comic Con for stock market investors.  ;)

http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2015/07/15/san-diego-comic-con-2015-what-does-it-mean-for-inv.aspx (http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2015/07/15/san-diego-comic-con-2015-what-does-it-mean-for-inv.aspx)
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on October 16, 2015, 05:16:48 AM
Quote
If you spent any time at all at New York Comic Con last weekend, you know there were lots and lots and LOTS of people crowding the Javits Center on the west edge of Manhattan. Official attendance numbers now confirm that observation. ReedPop just confirmed to me that the official attendance at the show topped 167,000 people for the four day event.

That figure tops last year’s announced attendance of more than 150,000. ReedPop attributes the increase to the expansion of the convention to offsite locations, principally the Hammerstein Ballroom, a 12,000 square foot facility on west 34th street nearby the Javits Center that hosted programs on Friday and Saturday. It does not include attendance at various “Super Week” events around the city held in conjunction with the show, which did not require an NYCC badge or admission.

ReedPop counts unique attendees per day, not badges sold. People with multi-day badges are counted for each day they attend. The 167,000 attendance figure means 167,000 individual daily admissions over the course of the four days of the convention.
more @
http://www.forbes.com/sites/robsalkowitz/2015/10/15/how-many-fans-new-york-comic-con-sets-attendance-record/

A nice balanced analysis of the difference in how the con's count attendees.  In addition to the recognition that this year's nycc had a larger attendance then 2014.

As a side note I've been in contact with the author & have plans for a deeper collaboration between our two sites. Look for a survey shortly from Rob for a project he's working on.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Devorah on October 16, 2015, 05:58:27 AM
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A nice balanced analysis of the difference in how the con's count attendees.  In addition to the recognition that this year's nycc had a larger attendance then 2014.

http://www.meetings-conventions.com/Meeting-Facilities/San-Diego/Convention-Center/San-Diego-Convention-Center-p2232773 (http://www.meetings-conventions.com/Meeting-Facilities/San-Diego/Convention-Center/San-Diego-Convention-Center-p2232773)

Hmm, if this web site is to be believed, then the occupancy limit for the San Diego Convention Center at any one time is 117,686 people. If they reach max capacity during SDCC, then, using NYCC's calculation methods, total attendance for SDCC would be 470,744.

Thoughts?
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Transmute Jun on October 16, 2015, 06:48:49 AM
I was thinking about it from the other side: if it works that way, then wouldn't NYCC attendance be about 42,000 per day? But it seemed like far more people than that.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Transmute Jun on October 16, 2015, 09:10:08 AM
Okay, I guess I was right in my previous post. I just read this piece of the Forbes article.

Quote
“The reality is we have well over 130,000 attendees to our show (our badges have names on them) so a four day badge holder is counted as one unique attendee,” says David Glanzer, Director of Marketing and PR for San Diego Comic-Con. “This was considered a benefit to exhibitors because it would let them know how many people they could encounter over the course of the event. If we counted unique attendees per day, our number would be way in excess of 300,000 attendees.”

Interesting that Glanzer admitted that there were 'well over 130,000 attendees' and that unique attendees per day would be well over 300,000. Those are the most detailed numbers I've seen in a long time.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: hikanteki on October 16, 2015, 11:12:13 AM
Quote
If you spent any time at all at New York Comic Con last weekend, you know there were lots and lots and LOTS of people crowding the Javits Center on the west edge of Manhattan. Official attendance numbers now confirm that observation. ReedPop just confirmed to me that the official attendance at the show topped 167,000 people for the four day event.

That figure tops last year’s announced attendance of more than 150,000. ReedPop attributes the increase to the expansion of the convention to offsite locations, principally the Hammerstein Ballroom, a 12,000 square foot facility on west 34th street nearby the Javits Center that hosted programs on Friday and Saturday. It does not include attendance at various “Super Week” events around the city held in conjunction with the show, which did not require an NYCC badge or admission.

ReedPop counts unique attendees per day, not badges sold. People with multi-day badges are counted for each day they attend. The 167,000 attendance figure means 167,000 individual daily admissions over the course of the four days of the convention.
more @
http://www.forbes.com/sites/robsalkowitz/2015/10/15/how-many-fans-new-york-comic-con-sets-attendance-record/

This has been changed in the article to:

ReedPop counts badges sold, whether they are 3-day, 4-day or single day tickets.

Updates from the article:

Update, 10/16, 9:03 AM PT: ReedPop reached out to clarify that their initial characterization of how they count attendance was incorrectly conveyed when they were interviewed for this story. They do not count individual daily admissions; they count total tickets sold. The paragraph has been changed to reflect this new information.

The original quote (before the changes) struck me as odd, but the updates are consistent with what I’ve heard before.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: theresamather on January 13, 2016, 02:05:45 PM
I actually make the bulk of my income from smaller literary con art shows, which I can mail my work in to if they have an art show. This reduces my costs significantly. Commission is usually 10-15%, 4x4 foot panel fees range from $5-$40 on average. I let my Comic Con and Wondercon booths go for this year. I never didn't come out with a net profit but after taking into account the cost of being there, it was too much work and too many headaches for the amount of profit compared to the smaller cons. So we're using my husband's pro badges and just attending Comic Con this year...first time in well over a decade that I won't be trapped behind a table.... I'll put more artwork in the art show instead. I don't know if I'll return to doing booths... either the cost of doing them needs to come down for me or I need to finish a project which I have to promote.

I've finished all my work for January and February for my mail in shows, and I'm artist guest of honor at Westercon up in Portland, so I'll be there in person. But the booth thing.... maybe if I was younger and hungrier.   ;)
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on January 13, 2016, 05:54:24 PM
ohhhh,
you may want to join us for a meet up  ;) ..... I think the breakfast on Wednesday morning down town is still open.....  ;)

there might be some room on the sunday supper & swag trade but that's closed. Transmute won't know about that till later
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: theresamather on January 13, 2016, 06:32:38 PM
I have to hang my artwork in the art show on Wednesday and pack up what's left on Sunday (I'm also carting some non attending artists' work) but I'll keep meet ups in mind! :)
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on January 15, 2016, 12:24:42 PM
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I have to hang my artwork in the art show on Wednesday and pack up what's left on Sunday (I'm also carting some non attending artists' work) but I'll keep meet ups in mind! :)
I think the Wednesday breakfast runs from 8am to abt 10:30am with most of us there around 9am.... Lots to do that day by everyone! 
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: theresamather on January 15, 2016, 06:31:50 PM
Cool, I would like to hang out!  :D
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on January 15, 2016, 06:38:11 PM
you'll need to rsvp in a google doc
the instructions & info is here, http://friendsofcc.com/forum/index.php?topic=5642.msg138167#msg138167
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: MyNameIsRinoa on April 06, 2016, 03:59:44 PM
The only financial winners of comic cons are the organizers and nearby hotels, followed by celebrities, big name vendors, and surrounding/participating venues.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: marcia29 on April 21, 2016, 06:11:39 AM
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The only financial winners of comic cons are the organizers and nearby hotels, followed by celebrities, big name vendors, and surrounding/participating venues.

Agree. I will have to look up how much SDCC takes in...
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: riotgirl77 on September 29, 2016, 12:40:43 PM
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/stars-getting-rich-fan-conventions-933062 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/stars-getting-rich-fan-conventions-933062)

"Stars Getting Rich Off Fan Conventions: How to Take Home "Garbage Bags Full of $20s"

One effect of superhero culture: a proliferation of fan events where Marvel movie heroes and 'Walking Dead' stars walk away with six figures (more than most get paid for their real jobs) for a weekend's work.

It's like a scene from Blow or Goodfellas: a room full of money with professional cash counters." This isn't a description of a drug den or casino cage. It's the backroom of a fan festival, says one producer familiar with such events, where thousands of die-hards - many in costume - pay admission to fork over bigger bucks for autographs and photos with their favorite stars. And nearly all of this money is going into the pockets of talent big and small who, in many cases, now can earn more from weekend fan events than from the shows and movies making them famous.

Fan conventions, where stars can take home hundreds of thousands of dollars in exchange for a few hours of time, once were the domain of has-beens and sci-fi novelties. But the business has become so lucrative - think $500,000 for Captain America's Chris Evans or The Walking Dead favorite Norman Reedus to appear - that current TV and film stars are popping up at events like Salt Lake City Comic-Con and Heroes and Villains Fan Fest. The demand has become so overwhelming that agencies including WME, CAA, UTA, ICM, APA, Paradigm and Gersh have in the past three years added "personal appearance" agents to sift through the hundreds of annual events, book talent and (of course) score their 10 percent commission.

"If somebody wanted to do a convention every weekend, they could make more on the convention circuit than their episodic fee," says Arrow star Stephen Amell, who became so enamored of the festival business that he started his own talent agency, WFA Entertainment, to help other actors navigate the space (and score a buck for himself). The actor, who is said to have irked traditional agents by competing with them, says he "wanted to control the whole front- and backend of my operation. I didn't see a need for representation." One source deeply involved in the convention circuit estimates that Amell walks away with $250,000 a weekend - more than he makes per episode for Arrow - though he denies that figure.

Here's how it works: Actors typically ask for a price guarantee - often paid up front - to show up, sign autographs, pose for photos and sometimes take part in a panel discussion or two. Most conventions charge an entry fee, collect $5 for every autograph and $10 per photo (with a photographer taking another $10). The stars - who receive luxury travel and accommodations - pocket the rest. Anything over the guarantee is icing on the cake.

According to multiple sources familiar with convention deals, the basic guarantee rate for genre stars is in the $5,000 to $10,000 range per appearance - with leads on such current TV series as The Walking Dead, Once Upon a Time, Supernatural, The Vampire Diaries, Netflix's Marvel shows and The CW's DC Comics fare commanding anywhere from $35,000 to $250,000 and up, depending on their popularity and the frequency with which they appear. At top conventions, it's not uncommon for a star to earn anywhere from $50,000 to $100,000 on top of their guarantee (more if they spend extra time signing).

The most sought-after stars include Reedus (one convention owner says he easily could command a $200,000 guarantee and pocket $500,000 per weekend), Andrew Lincoln (who donates his proceeds to charity), Star Wars great Mark Hamill and anyone who played Doctor Who. Sources say ex-Doctor Matt Smith collected $250,000 per weekend at a string of recent events, with any former Doctor said to easily score six figures. Smith's tally recently was doubled by Marvel film heroes, with the stars netting more than $500,000 each in one Atlanta weekend thanks to an overwhelming demand and rare convention appearances.

"There are plenty of people who can command six figures - plenty can make seven figures any given year," says one agency insider. Amell has a profit participation stake in the Heroes and Villains Fan Fest, which has six events in different cities scheduled through October 2017. HVFF is not profitable yet, but in success the actor will receive a cut of the gate as well as photo and autograph revenue from those involved - without even having to be there (and more if he booked the talent).

As if the conventions weren't already lucrative enough, many stars also are contacted independently by autograph dealers looking to arrange meet-ups outside of events and can score anywhere from $6,000 to $250,000 to sign a few hundred items that will wind up on eBay. That's one reason why Hamill and other stars are especially sensitive about fakes and are backing a new California bill that would require autographed collectibles sold in the state to come with a certificate of authenticity (yet another extra charge at conventions).

"The fact is, a guest star on a TV show can [get] around $10,000, whereas you can work two days at a convention and pull in the same amount - and sometimes double and triple that," says Firefly actress Jewel Staite, who did 12 conventions last year while pregnant with her son and, as she says, "pretty much not hireable." She'll do the same when she has a second child. "Have I turned down smaller jobs that won't pay as much? Absolutely. It would be silly of me to say yes to the job that pays $10,000 for a week of work and bow out of a big convention where I could potentially walk away with $40,000 in two days."

That decision, however, can prove shortsighted. Multiple producers say if guest or recurring actors turn them down in favor of conventions, they likely won't get called again. In some cases, genre shows have started putting their superhero boot down on talent who ask for time off to do a fan event. But some producers use the second revenue stream to lure talent to genre shows. "In a world where residuals don't mean as much, conventions are like residuals," says Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow executive producer Marc Guggenheim. Adds Staite, "My actor friends are always saying how much they're dying for a genre show just to break into the convention world."

Making them more appealing, some of the smaller, privately owned events have been known to deal in cash (though many are starting to clean up their books as audits hit the circuit). "I know someone who literally takes garbage bags full of $20s with him back home," says one convention regular who wished not to be identified, noting that another star hides convention earnings in art. Says Amell of the practice, "It's like Andy Dufresne in Shawshank Redemption and hiding dirt."

Three big companies dominate the paid-convention space: Wizard World, Informa and ReedPop (each with about 20-plus events set for 2017), all of which are publicly traded. But while conventions are rewarding for attendees and talent, the financial picture for those running them often is less rosy. "It's not easy - there are huge logistics to it, and it's a major undertaking, but we've got it down well," says Wizard World CEO John Maatta, who had a 20-year run at Warner Bros. Television. Many smaller outfits struggle to make ends meet as competition increases. "Talent makes more in a weekend than I make annually," says Salt Lake City Comic-Con founder Dan Farr, who launched the event in 2013 and didn't turn a profit until last year. James Frazier started the popular Walking Dead fan fest Walker Stalker Con in 2012 with $15,000 raised by a Kickstarter campaign; in 2017 it will grow to 15 events, including a cruise to London. "Right now, the convention market is oversaturated; there's a ton of them, notes Frazier. "We are, in some ways, retracting for next year."

Still, for networks and studios, fan conventions also can be a boon for free publicity, though some - like AMC - have toyed with creating their own events to get in on the cash grab for lucrative brands like Walking Dead. Ultimately, say sources, many back down to maintain talent relationships. Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman is said to have strongly opposed the idea, prompting AMC to retreat from the space. "Not everything has to be monetized," says TWD exec producer Dave Alpert, who supports Walker Stalker. "What's important is that the community feels vibrant and engaged. As long as that happens … we should all be able to make a living and the money will come." Other studios, like Warner Bros. Television, frown at talent accepting payment for appearing at events. (Sources say WBTV pulled out of New York Comic-Con after organizers wanted to pay a handful of their stars.)

With stars like Evans, Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleston joining such talent as Lou Ferrigno (The Incredible Hulk), Kevin Sorbo (Hercules) and the cast of Buffy on the circuit, the stigma of a convention paycheck has all but vanished. A-listers can judiciously attend paid fan events without damaging their brand or impacting their ability to command a seven- or eight-figure payday. It's all considered marketing - paid marketing. "The way people used to think about conventions - and some still do - was that it was someplace actors who had fame early on went as almost a last resort," says Amell. "And that's just not true anymore."

A version of this story first appeared in the Oct. 14 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: marcia29 on September 29, 2016, 01:05:46 PM
Wow...just...wow...
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on September 29, 2016, 01:17:05 PM
we've got a separate thread going for this-
http://www.friendsofcc.com/forum/index.php?topic=7359.0

we probably will move that thread over here... give management a bit-
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: riotgirl77 on September 29, 2016, 01:18:18 PM
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we've got a separate thread going for this-
http://www.friendsofcc.com/forum/index.php?topic=7359.0

we probably will move that thread over here... give management a bit-

oh woops didn't see that thread...thanks for posting it here
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on December 28, 2016, 10:18:30 AM
Rob Salkowitz  did an excellent write up on the upcoming year in Con's. I encourage folks who are interested to give it a read- the last paragraph is of particular interest.....

http://icv2.com/articles/columns/view/36374/five-convention-trends-watch-2017#.WGO-ojVSO7w.twitter
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: FBS on December 28, 2016, 12:13:55 PM
Good article.
Maybe 2017 will be the year comic-con international will finally utilise the "international" part of their name. 😀
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Transmute Jun on December 28, 2016, 03:09:54 PM
CCI did purchase a new building in downtown San Diego and quietly moved into it. They let go of APE. It does suggest that they might be considering taking on a third con.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: AzT on January 23, 2017, 07:03:42 AM
A vendor's perspective; fascinating read:

http://www.comicsbeat.com/whatever-happened-to-comic-con-a-veteran-vendor-speaks/
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on January 23, 2017, 08:36:22 AM
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A vendor's perspective; fascinating read:

http://www.comicsbeat.com/whatever-happened-to-comic-con-a-veteran-vendor-speaks/

agreed, [member=10]ukdeejay[/member] and i spoke to this on the hang out Sunday, http://friendsofcc.com/2017/01/22/hangout-comic-cons-vs-fan-fests-week-in-review/
to my mind, the important thing is to separate the different types of conventions, Fan Fests vs Comic Con's and plan accordingly.

Rob Sulk (something) also did a good article today on ICV2, http://icv2.com/articles/columns/view/36564/2017-the-year-fan-cons-spread-their-
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: matthew on April 15, 2017, 09:15:33 AM
a nycc table, with the right product, will get decent sales. the same product at sdcc will do very poorly. often sdcc attendees will only mob a table offering free things. two different cultures, or perhaps the giveaways have trained the old standing attendees to expect free stuff. cut out anything free, and they wont expect it after 2 years. it will just be a silly legend from times past.



(insert lex luther laugh here)
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: mark on April 15, 2017, 02:46:13 PM
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a nycc table, with the right product, will get decent sales. the same product at sdcc will do very poorly. often sdcc attendees will only mob a table offering free things. two different cultures, or perhaps the giveaways have trained the old standing attendees to expect free stuff. cut out anything free, and they wont expect it after 2 years. it will just be a silly legend from times past.



(insert lex luther laugh here)

What would be an example? I agree that a lot of SDCC attendees don't go to shop, (though I usually manage to spend enough to make up for some of them) but the vendors I talk to have a big range of experiences.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: matthew on April 23, 2017, 07:51:27 PM
fear not mark!

there are advantages, should you know them in advance. (almost the purpose of this site, no?)

the comic artists attending nycc were almost all legends these last 2 years. this is because many talk amoung themselves, and decided that nycc is far more profitable for them. this action pushed out many of the lesser known names. only room for so many. making the best collection of artists at any convention on the planet. many do not bother with sdcc at all any more.

nycc. more classic artists than gencon. that is insane.

i wonder who, or what is filling up all those slots in sdcc? "lesser" artists? more booths? more walking space?






what would the long term impact be? i dont know. but it is a interesting development.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: cabler30 on July 31, 2017, 05:02:06 PM
From what i have read in past, some skip cons to go to others or dont go to conventions for different reasons. so if ever try visit comic makers any or every year and say hi and chat some if possible so they know they are still valued and all. get something signed or take a pic if can. I had chance go to SDCC 2017 and made a pont to try visit or say hi to any i knew of or connected to on fb and was able to see some cause others were busy or not at booth for watever reason.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: AzT on November 18, 2017, 11:43:43 PM
Wizard World endgame?

https://icv2.com/articles/news/view/38931/another-big-loss-wizard-world

Quote

Wizard World’s tough year continued in Q3, with an operating loss of $1.3 million and the disclosure with its Q3 financials that "...there is substantial doubt about the company’s ability to continue as a going concern through November 2018."  The going concern opinion is tied to the company’s cash position of around $1.18 million at the end of Q3, and the company’s operating losses of over $1 million per quarter.  The company’s operating losses totaled $4.45 million for the first nine months of 2017.

After interest and the changing in value of derivative liabilities (which fluctuate depending on stock price), total losses for the quarter were $3.7 million.

Wizard World has now burned through all of the nearly $2.5 million in new financing it raised less than a year ago (see "Wizard World Secures Financing — At a Cost"), and more.  The company cited its past success at raising additional equity investment and indicated it expects to be able to raise more cash from related parties and others to fund its operations going forward.

The basic problem is that the company is spending more to mount its shows but attendance is dropping, a sign that it’s not putting together celebrity packages that draw fans as they have in the past.  Wizard World put on four shows in Q3, the same number as last year, but revenues were down over $1 million for the quarter.  We note that this phenomenon started around the time Wizard World parted ways (acrimoniously) with Steve Shamus, who’d been booking its celebrities (see "Wizard World, Stephen Shamus Settle Lawsuits").

Wizard World scaled back its plans dramatically in September and now plans to mount a total of 14 shows in 2017 and 17 in 2018 (see "Wizard Cuts Eight Shows from Planned 2017 Schedule").
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: Transmute Jun on November 19, 2017, 08:51:45 AM
That bit you quoted hit the nail on the head, AzT. The guests have been lackluster and they've been moving to other sorts of guests, who aren't as big a draw. It's not a surprise that revenues are declining.

Creation (which has a similar model to Wizard World) has had problems as well, but in their case it's because their audience is declining. They have the same guests over and over again, year after year, and it's just not exciting any longer. They really need new blood (say, getting cast members from Discovery or The Orville) but they have been unable to do so (other than occasional appearances by Karl Urban).
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: cabler30 on November 19, 2017, 10:46:21 AM
This past SDCC year i made sure to check out artist alley and see what stars might be around in area where they was sorting bags and all. they didnt have many familiar stars that i realy wanted to see since check the updates and books we got free. had chance get comic signed by chance cause never know when it happen again in future. everyone goes to cons for different reasons and so some stuff that was popular before has i guess died out so traffic now as said above try get free swag, funko, wait for panels and whatever else. some stuff i tried do but wasnt able cause had to work at time so had to miss at time. i learn every year is different so i have learn to adjust and do what i can at time.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: AzT on May 19, 2020, 11:50:41 PM
From https://icv2.com/articles/news/view/45768/with-comic-cons-lockdown-organizers-move-online-mixed-results

Quote
Meanwhile the fan-favorite brands like Wizard World, ReedPOP, GalaxyCon and FanExpo have the attention of the audience but are scrambling to deliver a high-quality experience for both fans and talent online.  That’s led to some interesting philosophical differences among the various players, with Powers suggesting technical excellence is all that matters while Broder argues that "it will all come down to who can do the marketing well and reach the audience."

Unfortunately, neither side has come up with a great solution for retailers.  Over the weekend, I participated in an online conversation about the future of conventions hosted by podcaster Leonard Sultana ("An Englishman In San Diego"), where geek fashion entrepreneur Tony Kim, founder of Hero Within, lamented the huge challenge of losing 60% of his revenues generated at shows and conventions.  "For apparel, it’s a tactile experience. We want people to feel the fabrics, try on the fit of our clothes," he said.  "We can sell online, but we can’t capture that aspect of it."

More 2020 cancels: https://www.mcmcomiccon.com/london-may-2020/news/an-update-on-mcm-comic-con-london-and-covid-19

Quote
It is with a heavy heart that we today announce the cancellation of MCM Birmingham  Comic Con June, MCM London Comic Con July, MCM Manchester Comic Con, August, and MCM Scotland Comic Con September following the escalation of COVID-19 in the UK, Europe, and globally.
Title: Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
Post by: alyssa on August 10, 2021, 07:58:52 AM
Fan Expo buys Wizard World!

Wow- a real change in the post(hopefully) covid convention landscape

https://comicbook.com/comics/news/wizard-world-conventions-ending-fan-expo-purchase/

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