Author Topic: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's  (Read 23869 times)

Offline alyssa

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The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« on: January 23, 2015, 05:54:43 AM »
I ran across an interesting article which surveyed more then a 100 vendors/talent at conventions.  The article went into the amt of money made at each con.
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Offline tehlilone

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2015, 07:36:46 AM »
That's interesting to see. I skimmed the report. I might've missed it but I'm assuming the numbers are based on profits and not flat sales amounts? I'd like to see booth/table costs compared also.

I also don't think it said if they averaged the amount of days each show was. For instance, SDCC is a 4-5 day event when other shows are only 1-2 days.

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #2 on: Today at 07:34:30 PM »

Offline Transmute Jun

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2015, 07:51:00 AM »
I was reading that article a couple of days ago, and one thing that struck me was how little these small artists make. Even at the top cons, it was something like $1,000 to $2,000 per show, and that's before all of their costs. It's really not very much, and it brought home to me how much they appreciate any business they can get.

Offline vegasndn

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2015, 08:35:28 AM »

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I was reading that article a couple of days ago, and one thing that struck me was how little these small artists make. Even at the top cons, it was something like $1,000 to $2,000 per show, and that's before all of their costs. It's really not very much, and it brought home to me how much they appreciate any business they can get.
I'm surprise by how much they make. At SDCC I walk around in artist alley while people are fighting over free swag. I wonder around and  just talk to the vendors. Some will be sitting there looking bored, I'll ask them questions about their booth and boy do they light up and go on about their books, art and clothing. Just to listen to them and their passion it's pretty darn cool.

Offline Chris

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2015, 08:39:17 AM »
Am I missing it or did the article mention how much the vendors have to pay for their booths at the various shows?

At smaller shows for example when they vendors only have to pay $100 for their booth, they bring lower cost stuff because they are less concerned about recouping their costs.

The profit they make per booth after costs would be interesting to have.

Offline Trev

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2015, 09:15:37 AM »
I think it is gross and not net. labor and materials costs are not taken into account if I'm reading it correctly.

Offline Chris

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2015, 09:21:19 AM »
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I think it is gross and not net. labor and materials costs are not taken into account if I'm reading it correctly.

Net would be interesting to see as well.  I THINK (not 100% on this) that the smallest not-corner booth at SDCC is $2,000.  At mini cons, tables can be $100.

Offline Trev

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2015, 09:43:31 AM »
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Net would be interesting to see as well.  I THINK (not 100% on this) that the smallest not-corner booth at SDCC is $2,000.  At mini cons, tables can be $100.

AA is free at SDCC and Small Press is like $500 or $800, I think. The red area is where it starts to get a bit pricier for small vendors.

Offline Chris

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2015, 09:45:19 AM »
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AA is free at SDCC and Small Press is like $500 or $800, I think. The red area is where it starts to get a bit pricier for small vendors.

Yeah, sorry.  My $ figure was for booth vendors like comic back issue sales, not artist's alley, small press, etc.  Good point.

Offline Mel

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2015, 09:45:37 AM »
I wonder why they didn't post profit graphs and only sales? They know the profts because under "Super Rating" it says they got the super rating by taking average profits (sales minus booth cost) x rating.

Seems to me that sales v. profit is a big distinction. My friend is an exhibitor and told me she usually always makes more at smaller shows because of lower booth cost plus higher visibility when there aren't a million vendors to compete with.
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Offline Chris

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2015, 09:48:20 AM »
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I wonder why they didn't post profit graphs and only sales? They know the profts because under "Super Rating" it says they got the super rating by taking average profits (sales minus booth cost) x rating.

Seems to me that sales v. profit is a big distinction. My friend is an exhibitor and told me she usually always makes more at smaller shows because of lower booth cost plus higher visibility when there aren't a million vendors to compete with.

Agreed.  As I talk to back issue vendors, the thing they are always talking about is their break even point.  Usually I have heard them talk about the break even for their booth costs and then their break even for the show (hotel, travel costs, etc).

I have seen a lot of stressed out vendors until they hit the 2nd mark.

Offline Mel

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2015, 09:55:01 AM »
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Agreed.  As I talk to back issue vendors, the thing they are always talking about is their break even point.  Usually I have heard them talk about the break even for their booth costs and then their break even for the show (hotel, travel costs, etc).

I have seen a lot of stressed out vendors until they hit the 2nd mark.
Yep. I wonder how any of the smaller vendors make money at SDCC, it's easy to get lost in the mix with all the huge exhibitors. And add the travel and hotel and shipping your product. My friend told me she tries to take into account the exposure at SDCC, but she's an artist with a web comic specializing in merch based on her characters. I don't think exposure would matter as much to comic book dealers. People are just going to those booths looking for the best deal that day. Not a character or item to fall in love with and seek out from them in the future.
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Offline Chris

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2015, 10:00:49 AM »
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Yep. I wonder how any of the smaller vendors make money at SDCC, it's easy to get lost in the mix with all the huge exhibitors. And add the travel and hotel and shipping your product. My friend told me she tries to take into account the exposure at SDCC, but she's an artist with a web comic specializing in merch based on her characters. I don't think exposure would matter as much to comic book dealers. People are just going to those booths looking for the best deal that day. Not a character or item to fall in love with and seek out from them in the future.

That is why a lot of comic vendors that I have spoken to have left--they don't make enough money.  The primary reasons for this that they have told me are:  rising booth prices and other costs and the change in the attendee base.

My opinion only:   This is why the silver age pavilion is most of what has survived.  Those books are higher price/margin so they can recuperate their costs more easily.

Does anyone know how some of the big booths like Fox work?  Are they trying to make money or is it straight up advertising budget?

Offline Mel

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2015, 10:05:59 AM »
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That is why a lot of comic vendors that I have spoken to have left--they don't make enough money.  The primary reasons for this that they have told me are:  rising booth prices and other costs and the change in the attendee base.

My opinion only:   This is why the silver age pavilion is most of what has survived.  Those books are higher price/margin so they can recuperate their costs more easily.

Does anyone know how some of the big booths like Fox work?  Are they trying to make money or is it straight up advertising budget?
Fox is the weird one out of the big corporate film/tv booths because they sell a little merchandise. WB, AMC, Starz ect just give away freebies and do autographs so I bet they are total marketing budget. Fox does bring in a little money.
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Offline karl clement

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Re: The business of comic con's & pop culture con's
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2015, 03:50:19 PM »
my experience has been that if they don't have what  you want they don't get your $$$$, that's the problem, if the vendor guesses wrong and forgets to bring stuff he will make less then the dealer who brings other stuff, its also price based as well, also its how its displayed, some venders poorly display there stock, there booth is poorly set up, hard to move around in, for myself if its hard to move around in  I stay away, no matter how good the product,
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