Author Topic: The business of comics  (Read 3832 times)

Offline AzT

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Re: The business of comics
« Reply #60 on: January 22, 2019, 09:47:54 PM »
Jimmy Palmiotti started a #newcreatoradvice conversation that is worth reading:

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So maybe we can give back a little. This hashtag #newcreatoradvice would be a good thing to use if you are an established creator and have advice for the new people coming into the field. Even the most basic advice would be appreciated. Any Pros interested?


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Other creators that have advice, use the hashtag so people can find it easily. #newcreatoradvice

"[He] was to tell that story once, to one person only, and much later in his life." - Fred Saberhagen


Offline AzT

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Re: The business of comics
« Reply #61 on: January 24, 2019, 10:56:46 AM »
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Representatives for DC declined to comment for this story Wednesday evening, however they did provide Newsarama with the memo that DC employees received from Pam Lifford, President, Warner Bros. Global Brands and Experiences.

The full text follows:

"Today has been a challenging day. We have made organizational changes across DC that we believe will help to strengthen and evolve the division for future success. With these changes come difficult decisions which we take very seriously.

"We recognize and appreciate that all of our employees have made considerable contributions to our business and that it is difficult to lose colleagues, many of whom have been here for a long time and have made an important impact on DC. We thank them for their hard work and dedication to DC. As always, we are committed to taking care of our employees and will be as thoughtful as possible with those who are impacted by these changes.

"Together with Dan and Jim, and the executive team, we have spent time assessing DC’s business, as well as the comic book publishing landscape. DC is going back to its roots of delivering epic stories with our world-class characters, stories and brands. Being a premier house of storytelling will never go out of style and we intend to ultimately super-serve our existing fans, while providing new compelling content that engages and excites even more fans around the globe. Rest assured, the direct market will remain at the heart of our business - and will continue to be one of our greatest strengths.

"The new streamlined structure is focused on creating, delivering and supporting a robust publishing operation that will allow DC to be nimble, navigate an industry in change, and thrive. As we communicated today, we are forming three distinct work streams - Editorial, Production & Manufacturing, and Publishing Support Services.

"Editorial will continue to be run by Bob Harras, SVP & Editor-In-Chief, who will now also be responsible for new initiatives and global publishing, editorial scheduling, and art direction Production & Manufacturing will continue to be run by Alison Gill, SVP Manufacturing & Operations Publishing Support Services is a new business unit consisting of all departments that support the sales, marketing and promotion of our books, and this will be run by Hank Kanalz who is taking on additional responsibilities as SVP Publishing Strategy & Support Services As a result - DC Collectibles and its team will be part of the Consumer Products Toy team moving forward.

"We recognize there are other groups across DC who are not fully dedicated to supporting the publishing business and, therefore, are not directly addressed in today’s news. As The Global Brands & Experiences structure continues to develop, I look forward to sharing more with you as that evolves.

"Many of you will have questions and in the coming days you will receive more information from Bob, Alison and Hank about their teams. Together with Dan and Jim, I will be hosting Town Hall meetings Thursday on the individual floors to discuss these changes and provide more insight.

"Thank you again for your support, hard work and loyalty to DC. Each of you are incredibly valued and I look forward to seeing you tomorrow afternoon where I will do my best to answer any questions." - Pam 

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DC's longtime Senior VP Art Director Mark Chiarello has been laid from the company as part of organizational changes announced on Wednesday, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Chiarello has been on staff at DC since 1993, joining the company after freelancing as an artist in comics and animation. Chiarello was hired as Color Editor - a then-new position in the comic industry, riding on the digital transition of that aspect of comics production. Chiarello was later elevated to Editorial Art Director, where he oversaw the art for the comics line and edited several limited series including Batman: Black & White, the Batman "Hush" arc, the Before Watchmen titles, New Frontier, Solo, and Wednesday Comics. He wrote the instructional book The DC Comics Guide to Coloring and Lettering Comics with Todd Klein.

While working at DC, Chiarello continued his illustration career, including work on Abrams Publishing's Heroes of the Negro League (with co-author Jack Morelli) and a 2009 Carhartt advertising campaign.

According to sources, Chiarello was amongst a small number of positions eliminated by DC - estimated at less than 3% of their workforce. In addition to Chiarello, SVP Sales Trade Marketing John Cunningham and VP Consumer Marketing Eddie Scannell were also among those whose positions were eliminated.
"[He] was to tell that story once, to one person only, and much later in his life." - Fred Saberhagen

Offline perc2100

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Re: The business of comics
« Reply #62 on: January 24, 2019, 12:45:39 PM »
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Some big stuff went down at IDW earlier this year and most of what I've heard hasn't been favorable. Basically, most of the people who were most loved in the industry were pushed out. It's been disheartening to me as a San Diegan

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For whatever reason I'm just noticing this thread.  I too live in San Diego and have a keen interest in IDW.  I've met their co-founder, their Editor in Chief (who would've been announced around the time of this post of yours last spring), as well as some of their other artists and writers (Kevin Eastman and his wife live pretty close to me & go to the same martial arts studio as my family).  Can you elaborate what you meant?  Obviously nearly a year later it could be difficult to find what info you had to make this post, but IDW seems to be doing pretty well.  They did substantially tone down their Comic Art Gallery (i.e. the first floor of their HQ in Liberty Station), but I haven't necessarily seen a drop in their quality as far as the books go.  I think their ending of their Transformers series was a bummer but they're essentially rebooting it this spring (they had some great talent on those books).  What else have you heard going down with them?

Offline AzT

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Re: The business of comics
« Reply #63 on: January 24, 2019, 12:54:17 PM »
Most recent IDW press releases about the state of their business:

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"[He] was to tell that story once, to one person only, and much later in his life." - Fred Saberhagen