Poll

Armed only with what you know *right now*, do you think SDCC will return to an in-person event in 2021?

Yes
33 (36.7%)
No
57 (63.3%)

Total Members Voted: 90


Author Topic: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)  (Read 10724 times)

Offline chocolateshake

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #150 on: January 09, 2021, 10:03:15 AM »
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That being said, once I saw that CCI received ppp funds, I'm not too worried about their financial output.  I suspect between insurance & the ppp funds they're in OK shape.

I don't see how CCI could be in financial distress anytime soon.  They have the reserves to ride out a failed con.  2020 was not that financially.  By reports, they were released from cancellation penalties for the 2020 contracts and there was insurance.  So they still have those reserves.  CCI is a volunteer organization.  They don't have that many permanent full time paid employees.  So the fixed costs shouldn't be very high.

Offline sefton42

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #151 on: January 12, 2021, 11:43:41 AM »
One of the bigwigs with CCI had said they had the reserves if they missed a con.  They never envisioned missing two — which they did last year.  Wondercon definitely won’t happen in March, so that’s three.  Without the stimulus money, I think CCI would be in pretty bad shape.

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #152 on: Today at 01:15:26 PM »

Online SteveD

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #152 on: January 20, 2021, 06:59:15 AM »
Maybe [hopefully] we will know something by the end of the month, You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login.

Quote
"I don't think anything is off the table," David Glanzer, Chief Communications and Strategy Officer for Comic-Con International, tells IGN. "But scenarios can change rapidly."

Quote
"We can, as an entity… plan one event and secure dates and all that," Glanzer notes, adding that he hopes to have an update on SDCC’s plans by the end of January. "But if there's a surge [in cases] or something happens, it can be shut down very quickly. There's just so many variables that I don't think any of us have ever had to deal with before, short of a natural disaster."

Offline JKingoftheNerds

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #153 on: January 23, 2021, 03:06:12 PM »
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Question: if CCI asked for donations to survive, would you donate?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Oh yeah, of CCI asked for donations to help SDCC survive, I wouldn't hesitate.

Offline chocolateshake

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #154 on: January 29, 2021, 12:46:19 PM »
Take a look at this.

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This is the what happens where people wear masks, respect lock downs and contact trace.  In short, take the pandemic seriously.  If we did that here, then we could have comic-con this year.  So far we haven't.  We still could.  There's time.  Is there the will?

Offline alyssa

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #155 on: January 29, 2021, 01:22:36 PM »
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Take a look at this.

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This is the what happens where people wear masks, respect lock downs and contact trace.  In short, take the pandemic seriously.  If we did that here, then we could have comic-con this year.  So far we haven't.  We still could.  There's time.  Is there the will?

It isn't that simple. i wish it was. A lot of folk simply can not respect the lockdown, they have to work
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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #156 on: January 29, 2021, 01:42:25 PM »
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It isn't that simple. i wish it was. A lot of folk simply can not respect the lockdown, they have to work

I'm sure people had to work in New Zealand, too. It's the people who disrespect the lockdown for no reason other than they want to prove they can who make it impossible to achieve control over the virus.

Offline chocolateshake

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #157 on: January 29, 2021, 01:51:08 PM »
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It isn't that simple. i wish it was. A lot of folk simply can not respect the lockdown, they have to work

They have the same considerations in New Zealand and everywhere else where covid has been defeated.  In all those countries they have essential workers that have to work to keep things going.  That can be done safely.  The responsibility is on the workers and everyone else.  The workers can keep themselves safe by following safety protocols like wearing masks.  Everyone else can keep them safe by staying at home and following the same protocols during their essential trips out.  I get angry when I see unmasked customers interacting with masked workers.  It's so disrespectful.

It is that simple.  The countries that have done it have proven that.  We have had the tools all along to defeat covid.  We just lack the will.

Offline perc2100

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #158 on: January 30, 2021, 10:46:40 AM »
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They have the same considerations in New Zealand and everywhere else where covid has been defeated.  In all those countries they have essential workers that have to work to keep things going.  That can be done safely.  The responsibility is on the workers and everyone else.  The workers can keep themselves safe by following safety protocols like wearing masks.  Everyone else can keep them safe by staying at home and following the same protocols during their essential trips out.  I get angry when I see unmasked customers interacting with masked workers.  It's so disrespectful.

It is that simple.  The countries that have done it have proven that.  We have had the tools all along to defeat covid.  We just lack the will.
Also other countries that successfully combatted COVID-19 had federal governments who worked to 1) protect citizens by passing rigorous laws 2) were mostly unified in their message of how citizens can keep safe (masks, lock-down/stay home when you can, etc) 3) paid citizens to stay home.
New Zealand, for example, paid their citizens about $600 _A WEEK_ while they had their rigorous shut-down.  US government paid its citizens $600 TOTAL between May-Feb. 
US government could have 100% afforded to pay citizens who couldn't work from home and couldn't afford to take off work.

It's become increasingly clear that the US Federal government has _epically_ failed us in their response to this pandemic: every single step of the way.  Even the vaccine distribution, the ONE thing we've known was a certainty and had PLENTY of time to plan for in order to have a well-organized robust plan to distribute ASAP to all, was a failure.  It's not JUST that the US is clearly full of incredibly selfish people who refuse to wear masks & socially distance themselves; it's not JUST that folks can't afford to take off work and stay home for months, or have the luxury of a job that they can work from home.  It's all of that AND an epic failure of US government.

It's sad that we've passed the one year anniversary of the first US COVID-19 patient and the only improvement is that we have vaccines that may or may not be effective against the viral mutations.

Offline alyssa

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #159 on: January 30, 2021, 11:34:08 AM »
exactly,
service industry folks have a choice, break quarantine or starve.
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Offline chocolateshake

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #160 on: January 30, 2021, 12:38:27 PM »
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New Zealand, for example, paid their citizens about $600 _A WEEK_ while they had their rigorous shut-down.  US government paid its citizens $600 TOTAL between May-Feb. 

While I definitely agree with the overall sentiment about the pathetic government response in the US, our response in terms of payments was pretty much the same as New Zealand's.  NZ paid people that were required to quarantined but could not work from home.  The US paid people that were not able to work from home, unemployed, $600 per week in addition to traditional unemployment.  So the US scheme actually paid out more.  That's for people that outright lost their jobs.  The US also had the PPP program that paid companies to keep people employed even if they couldn't go to work.  Which is more similar to what NZ did.  They paid companies $585/week to keep people technically employed when they could not work due to stay at home.  Which is what PPP did.  It paid companies to keep employees on the workforce even when they could not work.  There were millions of people that couldn't go to work, airline workers for example, that still got paid by their employers using money provided by the government.  Also, unemployment was extended to people that would not traditionally get it.  The self employed for example.  Many of the rules that govern unemployment were waived.  Pretty much if you were effected by covid, you qualified for unemployment.  I do think that there should be hazard pay for essential workers.  They should get a $600/week hazard bonus for working during the pandemic.  If I have to pay more for my groceries because of that, I will.

So it was not a question of financial support, it was and is a question of people not abiding by the quarantine.  Many people were paid twice as much through expanded unemployment than they were on their jobs.  The problem was many people didn't use that money to stay home.   They treated it as a vacation and went to the beach, hung out at bars or took a road trip.  That's the problem.  In NZ the people took it seriously.  Most stayed home.  The ones that didn't were policed by the government.  The NZ government took enforcement of the lockdown seriously.  In the US, the government simply isn't interested in enforcing the lockdowns.  Here in the San Diego, law enforcement in some places have even said they have no intention of enforcing any covid restrictions.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2021, 12:41:06 PM by chocolateshake »

Offline alyssa

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #161 on: January 31, 2021, 06:10:31 AM »
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While I definitely agree with the overall sentiment about the pathetic government response in the US, our response in terms of payments was pretty much the same as New Zealand's.  NZ paid people that were required to quarantined but could not work from home.  The US paid people that were not able to work from home, unemployed, $600 per week in addition to traditional unemployment.  So the US scheme actually paid out more.  That's for people that outright lost their jobs.  The US also had the PPP program that paid companies to keep people employed even if they couldn't go to work.  Which is more similar to what NZ did.  They paid companies $585/week to keep people technically employed when they could not work due to stay at home.  Which is what PPP did.  It paid companies to keep employees on the workforce even when they could not work.  There were millions of people that couldn't go to work, airline workers for example, that still got paid by their employers using money provided by the government.  Also, unemployment was extended to people that would not traditionally get it.  The self employed for example.  Many of the rules that govern unemployment were waived.  Pretty much if you were effected by covid, you qualified for unemployment.  I do think that there should be hazard pay for essential workers.  They should get a $600/week hazard bonus for working during the pandemic.  If I have to pay more for my groceries because of that, I will.

So it was not a question of financial support, it was and is a question of people not abiding by the quarantine.  Many people were paid twice as much through expanded unemployment than they were on their jobs.  The problem was many people didn't use that money to stay home.   They treated it as a vacation and went to the beach, hung out at bars or took a road trip.  That's the problem.  In NZ the people took it seriously.  Most stayed home.  The ones that didn't were policed by the government.  The NZ government took enforcement of the lockdown seriously.  In the US, the government simply isn't interested in enforcing the lockdowns.  Here in the San Diego, law enforcement in some places have even said they have no intention of enforcing any covid restrictions.

We're talking about two different groups of quarantine breakers. The essential workers and the partiers. We both agree about the partiers. We disagree about the essential workers.
Unfortunately, in a lot of service jobs, grocery & big box store workers. restaurants/fast food that stayed open, Contractors - etc, unemployment is not an option. A worker can **not** quit & get unemployment.

The friends i have in retail/restaurant are beyond upset by the customers who are disrespectful about masks/view shopping as a leisure activity. But they are stuck, either they work or they don't pay their bills. I've heard one person say, they feel like slaves. Hyperbole for sure, but the effect is the same.
The risk is doubled when that person lives in a multi generational household which is dependent on that income. Or they are 55+.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2021, 06:47:29 AM by alyssa »
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Offline chocolateshake

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #162 on: January 31, 2021, 11:28:14 AM »
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We're talking about two different groups of quarantine breakers. The essential workers and the partiers. We both agree about the partiers. We disagree about the essential workers.
Unfortunately, in a lot of service jobs, grocery & big box store workers. restaurants/fast food that stayed open, Contractors - etc, unemployment is not an option. A worker can **not** quit & get unemployment.

The friends i have in retail/restaurant are beyond upset by the customers who are disrespectful about masks/view shopping as a leisure activity. But they are stuck, either they work or they don't pay their bills. I've heard one person say, they feel like slaves. Hyperbole for sure, but the effect is the same.
The risk is doubled when that person lives in a multi generational household which is dependent on that income. Or they are 55+.

Every country has essential workers including those that have defeated covid.  That's why it's essential to protect them.  They need to be proactive in protecting themselves by wearing PPE.  The rest of society has to be proactive in protecting them by staying home and not spreading covid.  Yes, essential workers do have to work.  We need them.  But they can do that safely if the rest of us do our part and stay at home, not hang out at beach bars.

In countries that have defeated covid, that's exactly what people do.  As I've said many times, I haven't seen much of a lockdown here in San Diego.  The streets are still full of traffic.  It is lighter, but still pretty dense.  In countries that have defeated covid, during lockdown, there are no cars on the street.  It's a ghost town except for the occasional first responder or essential worker on a delivery run.  In some countries the population does this willingly.  You don't have to tell people in HK to mask up and stay at home.  The second there's a single case of covid anywhere in HK, everyone self quarantines spontaneously.  In other countries the government has to enforce it.  Some countries have fines up to 10's of thousands of dollars.  Others arrest people for not wearing masks in public.  Some do both.  Australia is one of those.  They have massive fines as well as arrests to enforce public health measures.  It's worked.  While not as successful as NZ or China, they have covid contained.  Well enough to do this.

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So I don't disagree that essential workers have to work.  We need them to.  But as other countries have shown, they can do so safely if the rest of us do our part.

Offline ALF

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #163 on: February 01, 2021, 08:14:44 AM »
If I was a betting man which I am not since my luck is horrible, We won’t see a normal comic con until maybe 2 or 3 years from now.

Given just these two facts:
1.) multiple strands and mutation occurring. Like anything to do with odds, more people having it in the world eventually there will be a mutation that even the vaccine won’t work..
2.) it’s a pandemic on a global scale.

  :(

Who knows what’s going happen to Comic Con then?
Which each passing day, I wish I  went with the refund option for my 4 day pass for my wife and myself...

Offline alyssa

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Re: Poll: The Status of SDCC 2021 (In Light of the Pandemic)
« Reply #164 on: February 01, 2021, 09:22:38 AM »
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If I was a betting man which I am not since my luck is horrible, We won’t see a normal comic con until maybe 2 or 3 years from now.

Given just these two facts:
1.) multiple strands and mutation occurring. Like anything to do with odds, more people having it in the world eventually there will be a mutation that even the vaccine won’t work..
2.) it’s a pandemic on a global scale.

  :(

Who knows what’s going happen to Comic Con then?
Which each passing day, I wish I  went with the refund option for my 4 day pass for my wife and myself...

the good thing over looked by most of the reporting on the variants, is the fact that all the vaccines seem to lessen the effects of whichever strain of the virus. IOW, if you have gotten a vaccine, you won't be admitted to the hospital.
At this point covid be comes con-crud


from todays' NYtimes quoted because it's behind a paywall
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Quote
The news about the vaccines continues to be excellent — and the public discussion of it continues to be more negative than the facts warrant.

Here’s the key fact: All five vaccines with public results have eliminated Covid-19 deaths. They have also drastically reduced hospitalizations. “They’re all good trial results,” Caitlin Rivers, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, told me. “It’s great news.”

Many people are instead focusing on relatively minor differences among the vaccine results and wrongly assuming that those differences mean that some vaccines won’t prevent serious illnesses. It’s still too early to be sure, because a few of the vaccine makers have released only a small amount of data. But the available data is very encouraging — including about the vaccines’ effect on the virus’s variants.

“The vaccines are poised to deliver what people so desperately want: an end, however protracted, to this pandemic,” as Julia Marcus of Harvard Medical School recently wrote in The Atlantic.
Why is the public understanding more negative than it should be? Much of the confusion revolves around the meaning of the word “effective.”

What do we care about?
In the official language of research science, a vaccine is typically considered effective only if it prevents people from coming down with any degree of illness. With a disease that’s always or usually horrible, like ebola or rabies, that definition is also the most meaningful one.

But it’s not the most meaningful definition for most coronavirus infections.

Whether you realize it or not, you have almost certainly had a coronavirus. Coronaviruses have been circulating for decades if not centuries, and they’re often mild. The common cold can be a coronavirus. The world isn’t going to eliminate coronaviruses — or this particular one, known as SARS-CoV-2 — anytime soon.

Yet we don’t need to eliminate it for life to return to normal. We instead need to downgrade it from a deadly pandemic to a normal virus. Once that happens, adults can go back to work, and children back to school. Grandparents can nuzzle their grandchildren, and you can meet your friends at a restaurant.

As Dr. Ashish Jha, the dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, told me this weekend: “I don’t actually care about infections. I care about hospitalizations and deaths and long-term complications.”



The data
By those measures, all five of the vaccines — from Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Novavax and Johnson & Johnson — look extremely good. Of the roughly 75,000 people who have received one of the five in a research trial, not a single person has died from Covid, and only a few people appear to have been hospitalized. None have remained hospitalized 28 days after receiving a shot.

To put that in perspective, it helps to think about what Covid has done so far to a representative group of 75,000 American adults: It has killed roughly 150 of them and sent several hundred more to the hospital. The vaccines reduce those numbers to zero and nearly zero, based on the research trials.

Zero isn’t even the most relevant benchmark. A typical U.S. flu season kills between five and 15 out of every 75,000 adults and hospitalizes more than 100 of them.

I assume you would agree that any vaccine that transforms Covid into something much milder than a typical flu deserves to be called effective. But that is not the scientific definition. When you read that the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was 66 percent effective or that the Novavax vaccine was 89 percent effective, those numbers are referring to the prevention of all illness. They count mild symptoms as a failure.

CORONAVIRUS BRIEFING: An informed guide to the global outbreak, with the latest developments and expert advice.
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“In terms of the severe outcomes, which is what we really care about, the news is fantastic,” Dr. Aaron Richterman, an infectious-disease specialist at the University of Pennsylvania, said.

The variants
What about the highly contagious new virus variants that have emerged in Britain, Brazil and South Africa? The South African variant does appear to make the vaccines less effective at eliminating infections.

Fortunately, there is no evidence yet that it increases deaths among vaccinated people. Two of the five vaccines — from Johnson & Johnson and Novavax — have reported some results from South Africa, and none of the people there who received a vaccine died of Covid. “People are still not getting serious illness. They’re still not dying,” Dr. Rebecca Wurtz of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health told me.



The most likely reason, epidemiologists say, is that the vaccines still provide considerable protection against the variant, albeit not quite as much as against the original version. Some protection appears to be enough to turn this coronavirus into a fairly normal disease in the vast majority of cases.

“This variant is clearly making it a little tougher to get the most vigorous response that you would want to have,” Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, said. “But still, for severe disease, it’s looking really good.”



What would an expert do?
The biggest caveat is the possibility that future data will be less heartening. Johnson & Johnson and Novavax, for example, have issued press releases about their data, but no independent group has yet released an analysis. It will also be important to see much more data about how the vaccines interact with the variants.

But don’t confuse uncertainty with bad news. The available vaccine evidence is nearly as positive as it could conceivably be. And our overly negative interpretation of it is causing real problems.

Some people worry that schools cannot reopen even after teachers are vaccinated. Others are left with the mistaken impression that only the two vaccines with the highest official effectiveness rates — from Moderna and Pfizer — are worth getting.

In truth, so long as the data holds up, any of the five vaccines can save your life.

Last week, Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University told my colleague Denise Grady about a conversation he had with other experts. During it, they imagined that a close relative had to choose between getting the Johnson & Johnson vaccine now or waiting three weeks to get the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine. “All of us said, ‘Get the one tomorrow,’” Schaffner said. “The virus is bad. You’re risking three more weeks of exposure as opposed to getting protection tomorrow.”
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